Black Confederates

“There were more negro soldiers in the Union army than Gen. Lee ever mustered on any field of battle.” – Confederate Veteran Magazine, 1894

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That is not to say that Lee did not muster any negro soldiers, merely that the Union army compliment of negro soldiers outnumbered those witnessed in the army of Robert E. Lee.


This list is provided by Scott Williams.  It is not an all-inclusive compilation of Black Confederates, only a small sampling of accounts.

For general historical information on Black Confederates, contact Dr. Edward Smith, American University, 4400 Massachusetts Ave., N.W., Washington, DC 20016; Dean of American Studies. Dr. Smith is a black professor dedicated to clarifying the historical role of African Americans.


I have been advised that there may be inaccuracies with the opening statement, and that Ed Bearrs may not have made the indicated statement. I have no proof either way, and as such, present the original text unaltered, until verifiable information can be obtained to discredit the claim. As such, I urge the reader not to blindly accept the statement as fact, but as always, do your own research.

I have tried to present rebuttals at the bottom fairly impartially, though I am unable to divorce myself completely from the various sources that argue in my own favor. I am however reasonable and believe in truth. Therefore, any that can be sufficiently disproven I will immediately strike out with a line through the text. As shown with point 21 below, when fact can be presented, I will always side with fact.

Please do, however; be civil. There’s no need to engage in relentless personal attacks against me or anyone else. Facts are facts, and speak for themselves without childish insults and adolescent insecurities. I will acknowledge fact and truth with mutual respect.

Black Confederates

Why haven’t we heard more about them? National Park Service historian, Ed Bearrs, stated,  “I don’t want to call it a conspiracy to ignore the role of Blacks both above and below the Mason-Dixon line, but it was definitely a tendency,  which began around 1910.”  Historian, Erwin L. Jordan, Jr., calls it a “cover-up” which started back in 1865. He writes, “During my research, I came across instances where Black men stated they were soldiers, but you can plainly see where ‘soldier’ is crossed out and ‘body servant’ inserted, or ‘teamster’ on pension applications.” Another black historian, Roland Young, says he is not surprised that blacks fought. He explains that “…some, if not most, Black southerners would support their country” and that by doing so they were “demonstrating it’s possible to hate the system of slavery and love one’s country.” This is the very same reaction that most African Americans showed during the American Revolution, where they fought for the colonies, even though the British offered them freedom if they fought for them.

It has been estimated that over 65,000 Southern blacks were in the Confederate ranks.  Over 13,000 of these, “saw the elephant” also known as meeting the enemy in combat. These Black Confederates included both slave and free.  The Confederate Congress did not approve blacks to be officially enlisted as soldiers (except as musicians), until late in the war.  But in the ranks it was a different story.  Many Confederate officers did not obey the mandates of politicians, they frequently enlisted blacks with the simple criteria; “Will you fight?”   Historian Ervin Jordan, explains that “biracial units” were frequently organized “by local Confederate and State militia Commanders in response to immediate threats in the form of Union raids…”.  Dr. Leonard Haynes,  an African-American professor at Southern University, stated, “When you eliminate the black Confederate soldier, you’ve eliminated the history of the South.”

  • The “Richmond Howitzers” were partially manned by black militiamen. They saw action at 1st Manassas (or 1st Battle of Bull Run) where they operated battery no. 2. In addition two black “regiments”, one free and one slave, participated in the battle on behalf of the South.   “Many colored people were killed in the action”, recorded John Parker, a former slave.
  • At least one Black Confederate was a non-commissioned officer. James Washington, Co. D 34th Texas Cavalry, “Terrell’s Texas Cavalry” became it’s 3rd Sergeant. In comparison, The highest-ranking Black Union soldier during the war was a Sergeant Major.
  • Free black musicians, cooks, soldiers and teamsters earned the same pay as white confederate privates. This was not the case in the Union army where blacks did not receive equal pay. At the Confederate Buffalo Forge in Rockbridge County, Virginia, skilled black workers “earned on average three times the wages of white Confederate soldiers and more than most Confederate army officers ($350-$600 a year).
  • Dr. Lewis Steiner, Chief Inspector of the United States Sanitary Commission while observing Gen. “Stonewall” Jackson’s occupation of Frederick, Maryland, in 1862: “Over 3,000 Negroes must be included in this number [Confederate troops]. These were clad in all kinds of uniforms, not only in cast-off or captured United States uniforms, but in coats with Southern buttons, State buttons, etc. These were shabby, but not shabbier or seedier than those worn by white men in the rebel ranks. Most of the Negroes had arms, rifles, muskets, sabers, bowie-knives, dirks, etc., and were manifestly an integral portion of the Southern Confederate Army.”
  • Frederick Douglas reported, “There are at the present moment many Colored men in the Confederate Army doing duty not only as cooks, servants and laborers, but real soldiers, having musket on their shoulders, and bullets in their pockets, ready to shoot down any loyal troops and do all that soldiers may do to destroy the Federal government and build up that of the rebels.”
  • Black and white militiamen returned heavy fire on Union troops at the Battle of Griswoldsville (near Macon, GA). Approximately 600 boys and elderly men were killed in this skirmish.
  • In 1864, President Jefferson Davis approved a plan that proposed the emancipation of slaves, in return for the official recognition of the Confederacy by Britain and France. France showed interest but Britain refused.
  • The Jackson Battalion included two companies of black soldiers. They saw combat at Petersburg under Col. Shipp. “My men acted with utmost promptness and goodwill…Allow me to state sir that they behaved in an extraordinary acceptable manner.”
  • Recently the National Park Service, with a recent discovery, recognized that blacks were asked to help defend the city of Petersburg, Virginia and were offered their freedom if they did so. Regardless of their official classification, black Americans performed support functions that in today’s army many would be classified as official military service. The successes of white Confederate troops in battle, could only have been achieved with the support these loyal black Southerners.
  • Confederate General John B. Gordon (Army of Northern Virginia) reported that all of his troops were in favor of Colored troops and that it’s adoption would have “greatly encouraged the army”. Gen. Lee was anxious to receive regiments of black soldiers. The Richmond Sentinel reported on 24 Mar 1864, “None…will deny that our servants are more worthy of respect than the motley hordes, which come against us.” “Bad faith [to black Confederates] must be avoided as an indelible dishonor.”
  • In March 1865, Judah P. Benjamin, Confederate Secretary Of State, promised freedom for blacks that served from the State of Virginia. Authority for this was finally received from the State of Virginia and on April 1st 1865, $100 bounties were offered to black soldiers. Benjamin exclaimed, “Let us say to every Negro who wants to go into the ranks, go and fight, and you are free…Fight for your masters and you shall have your freedom.” Confederate Officers were ordered to treat them humanely and protect them from “injustice and oppression”.
  • A quota was set for 300,000 black soldiers for the Confederate States Colored Troops. 83% of Richmond’s male slave population volunteered for duty. A special ball was held in Richmond to raise money for uniforms for these men. Before Richmond fell, black Confederates in gray uniforms drilled in the streets. Due to the war ending, it is believed only companies or squads of these troops ever saw any action. Many more black soldiers fought for the North, but that difference was simply a difference because the North instituted this progressive policy more soon than the more conservative South. Black soldiers from both sides received discrimination from whites that opposed the concept.
  • Union General U.S. Grant in Feb 1865, ordered the capture of “all the Negro men… before the enemy can put them in their ranks.” Frederick Douglas warned Lincoln that unless slaves were guaranteed freedom (those in Union controlled areas were still slaves) and land bounties, “they would take up arms for the rebels”.
  • On April 4, 1865 (Amelia County, VA), a Confederate supply train was exclusively manned and guarded by black Infantry. When attacked by Federal Cavalry, they stood their ground and fought off the charge, but on the second charge they were overwhelmed. These soldiers are believed to be from “Major Turner’s” Confederate command.
  • A Black Confederate, George _____, when captured by Federals was bribed to desert to the other side. He defiantly spoke, “Sir, you want me to desert, and I ain’t no deserter. Down South, deserters disgrace their families and I am never going to do that.”
  • Former slave, Horace King, accumulated great wealth as a contractor to the Confederate Navy. He was also an expert engineer and became known as the “Bridge builder of the Confederacy.” One of his bridges was burned in a Yankee raid. His home was pillaged by Union troops, as his wife pleaded for mercy.
  • As of Feb. 1865 1,150 black seamen served in the Confederate Navy. One of these was among the last Confederates to surrender, aboard the CSS Shenandoah, six months after the war ended. This surrender took place in England.
  • Nearly 180,000 Black Southerners, from Virginia alone, provided logistical support for the Confederate military. Many were highly skilled workers. These included a wide range of jobs: nurses, military engineers, teamsters, ordnance department workers, brakemen, firemen, harness makers, blacksmiths, wagonmakers, boatmen, mechanics, wheelwrights, etc. In the 1920’S Confederate pensions were finally allowed to those workers that were still living.  Many thousands more served in other Confederate States.
  • During the early 1900’s, many members of the United Confederate Veterans (UCV) advocated awarding former slaves rural acreage and a home. There was hope that justice could be given those slaves that were once promised “forty acres and a mule” but never received any. In the 1913 Confederate Veteran magazine published by the UCV, it was printed that this plan “If not Democratic, it is [the] Confederate” thing to do. There was much gratitude toward former slaves, which “thousands were loyal, to the last degree”, now living with total poverty of the big cities.   Unfortunately, their proposal fell on deaf ears on Capitol Hill.
  • During the 5oth Anniversary of the Battle of Gettysburg in 1913, arrangements were made for a joint reunion of Union and Confederate veterans. The commission in charge of the event made sure they had enough accommodations for the black Union veterans, but were completely surprised when unexpected black Confederates arrived. The white Confederates immediately welcomed their old comrades, gave them one of their tents, and “saw to their every need”. Nearly every Confederate reunion including those blacks that served with them, wearing the gray.
  • The first military monument in the US Capitol that honors an African-American soldier is the Confederate monument at Arlington National cemetery. The monument was designed 1914 by Moses Ezekiel, a Jewish Confederate, who wanted to correctly portray the “racial makeup” in the Confederate Army. A black Confederate soldier is depicted marching in step with white Confederate soldiers.  Also shown is one “white soldier giving his child to a black woman for protection”. – Source: Edward Smith, African American professor at the American University, Washington DC. This point has been struck out in light of original information regarding the monument, but is here preserved as originally presented.
  • Black Confederate heritage is beginning to receive the attention it deserves. For instance, Terri Williams, a black journalist for the Suffolk “Virginia Pilot” newspaper, writes: “I’ve had to re-examine my feelings toward the [Confederate] flag…It started when I read a newspaper article about an elderly black man whose ancestor worked with the Confederate forces. The man spoke with pride about his family member’s contribution to the cause, was photographed with the [Confederate] flag draped over his lap…that’s why I now have no definite stand on just what the flag symbolizes, because it no longer is their history, or my history, but our history.”

Books:

Charles Kelly Barrow, et. al.  Forgotten Confederates: An Anthology About Black Southerners (1995). Currently the best book on the subject.

Ervin L. Jordan, Jr.  Black Confederates and Afro-Yankees in Civil War Virginia (1995).  Well researched and very good source of information on Black Confederates, but has a strong Union bias.

Richard Rollins.  Black Southerners in Gray (1994).  Also an excellent source.

Dr. Edward Smith and Nelson Winbush, “Black Southern Heritage”. An excellent educational video. Mr. Winbush is a descendent of a Black Confederate and a member of the Sons of Confederate Veterans (SCV).

Arguments Against Black Confederates

Because I received several messages from a reader on Twitter, I felt it would be unfair to present only the Sons of Confederate Veterans side, and am therefore also posting links that argue against black confederate soldiers.

First, we have the Daily Beast: Their basic argument is seen in the following excerpt:

What few people appear to be aware of is that the black Confederate narrative is a fairly recent phenomenon. The proliferation of these stories and the zeal for the black Confederate soldier expressed by many would be alien to their Confederate ancestors, who lived under a constitution strongly devoted to protecting if not extending slavery. It was not until March 1865—after a contentious debate that took place throughout the Confederacy—that the Confederate Congress passed legislation authorizing the enlistment of slaves who were first freed by their masters. Even those who finally came to support the legislation as the only alternative to defeat would have agreed with Howell Cobb: “If slaves will make good soldiers our whole theory of slavery is wrong.” Other than a small number that briefly trained in Richmond, Virginia, no black men served openly and there is no evidence that the Richmond recruits saw the battlefield in the final weeks of the war.

They go on to argue that the lack of any stories of valor or of participation of any kind serves as a sort of informal proof against the black soldier of the confederacy. More on that from Union, Confederate and Neutral parties below.

Next, we have a blog post written by Mr. Kevin Levin. his argument comes from a quote regarding a figure which black soldier proponents claim proves their theory that blacks served as soldiers. he provides a quote from those that dedicated the memorial, which make clear beyond any shadow of a doubt that the original intention of the memorial was not to show a black soldier, but a faithful servant following his master, as told by Moses Ezekiel as well as the folks who gathered to dedicate the monument in 1914, based upon the original, published history of the monument by Hilary A. Herbert:

There they come, representing every branch of the service, and in proper garb; soldiers, sailors, sappers and miners, all typified. On the right is a faithful negro body-servant following his young master… The astonishing fidelity of the slaves everywhere during the war to the wives and children of those who were absent in the army was convincing proof of the kindly relations between master and slave in the old South. One leading purpose of the U. D. C. is to correct history. Ezekiel is here writing it for them, in characters that will tell their story to generation after generation. Still to the right of the young soldier and his body-servant is an officer, kissing his child in the arms of an old negro “mammy.” Another child holds on to the skirts of “mammy” and is crying, perhaps without knowing why.

On this point, I can offer no suitable rebuttal, and as such, I have crossed out the above point number 21. Levin goes on to discredit the idea of the black soldier of the Confederacy by pointing out the lack of any reference to them:

You will not find a reference to black Confederate soldiers in any of the public addresses given at the monument’s commemoration nor will you find them in newspaper coverage of the event.  While there may be a few scattered references to black Confederate soldiers at this time, I have yet to come across one.  And I suspect that the reason they don’t exist is that white Americans have no use for it.

There are, as shown below, newspaper references, as well as Union Soldier accounts of seeing them, being fired upon by them, fighting against them, and seeing armed black soldiers dead on the battlefield.

LA Native Guards

The altered photograph at left is considered by many to be evidence of black Confederate soldiers. However, the photograph has been intentionally cropped and mislabeled. The photograph is presented in its original state at right, in which a Union officer is clearly shown. 1,500 free blacks formed the “1st Louisiana Native Guards” in the early days of the war, but they were ordered to disband by the Confederacy in January 1862. Some of the men of the unit later joined the Union Army. This photograph is of a Union U.S.C.T unit. (Civil War Times Illustrated)

I must, however; respectfully disagree with the outcome arrived at in this line of logic. This stance completely ignores the well documented words of Frederick Douglass: “It is now pretty well established that there are at the present moment many colored men in the Confederate army doing duty not only as cooks, servants and laborers, but as real soldiers, having muskets on their shoulders, and bullets in their pockets,” he wrote in July 1861. Slaveholders “accept the aid of the black man,” he said. “Why should a good cause be less wisely conducted?” Furthermore, African-American scholars from Ervin Jordan and Joseph Reidy to Juliet Walker and Henry Louis Gates Jr., editor-in-chief of The Root, have stood outside this impasse, acknowledging that a few blacks, slave and free, supported the Confederacy. In the “Official Records of the War of the Rebellion,” a collection of military records from both sides which spans more than 50 volumes and more than 50,000 pages, there are seven Union eyewitness reports of black Confederates.  Three of these reports mention black men shooting at Union soldiers, one report mentions capturing a handful of armed black men along with some soldiers, and the other three reports mention seeing unarmed black laborers..


The following points are taken from the books “Black Confederates” and “Black Southerners in Confederate Armies”. I make no claim to the validity of these points as I have not personally read or inspected all sources. They are offered below merely as a starting point for anyone wishing to research further.

  • Alfred Bellard, a white soldier of the 5th NJ Infantry, reported in his memoirs the shooting of two black Confederate snipers by member’s of the Berdan’s Sharpshooters in April of 1862. “One of the Negro Confederates was only wounded, but the other was killed one afternoon after leaving the security of a hollow tree (probably to relieve himself). Two Confederates tried to get to his body but were driven away by the Union gunfire”
    Alfred Bellard, Gone for a Soldier, p. 56
  • The Memphis Avalanche stated: “A procession of several hundred stout Negro men, of the domestic institution, marched through our streets yesterday  in military order, under command of Confederate officers.   A merrier set were never seen.  They were brimful of patriotism, shouting for Jeff. Davis and singing war-songs.”
  • Dr. Lewis Steiner, chief inspector of the United States Army Sanitary Commission, was an eyewitness to the occupation of Frederick, Maryland, by General Thomas J. “Stonewall” Jackson’s army. Steiner makes this statement about the makeup of that army: “Over 3,000 Negroes must be included in this number (Confederate troops). These were clad in all kinds of uniforms, not only in cast-off or captured United States uniforms, but in coats with Southern buttons, State buttons, etc. These were shabby, but not shabbier or seedier than those worn by white men in the rebel ranks. Most of the Negroes had arms, rifles, muskets, sabers, bowie-knives, dirks, etc….and were manifestly an integral portion of the Southern Confederacy Army.”
  • The “Richmond Howitzers” were partially manned by black militiamen. They saw action at First Manassas where they operated Battery number 2. In addition two black regiments, one free and one slave, participated in the battle on behalf of the South. “Many colored people were killed in the action”, recorded John Parker, a former slave.
  • We also have the testimony of Professor Ervin L. Jordan, Jr., who writes: “Numerous black Virginians served with Confederate forces as soldiers, sailors, teamsters, spies, and hospital personnel…. I know of black Confederate sharp-shooters who saw combat during the 1862 Seven Days Campaign and [of] the existence of black companies [which] organized and drilled in Richmond in March-April 1865. Integrated companies of black and white hospital workers fought against the Union army in the Petersburg trenches during March 1865. There were several recruitment campaigns and charity balls held in Virginia on behalf of black soldiers and special camps of instruction were established to train them.”
  • A telegram sent to the newspapers of the South: “New Orleans, November 23, 1861.  Over 28,000 troops were reviewed today by Gov. Moore, Major. Gen. Lovell, and Brig.-Gen. Ruggles.  The line was over seven miles long.  One regiment comprised 1,400 free colored men.”
  • We also do, indeed, have testimony from Southerners – In an 1862 letter to his uncle, a soldier at Camp Brown in Knoxville, Tennessee, wrote that his company had recently gunned down six Union soldiers and that “Jack Thomas a colored person that belongs to our company killed one of them.”
  • An 1861 article in the Montgomery Advertiser says: “We are informed that Mr. G.C. Hale, of Autauga County, yesterday tendered to Governor Moore the services of a company of negroes, to assist in driving back the horde of abolition sycophants who are now talking so flippantly of reducing to a conquered province the Confederate States of the South.” The obituary of black South Carolinian Henry Brown states that he had never been a slave and had served in three wars: the Mexican, the Spanish-American, and the Civil (on the side of the South). He was given a 21-gun salute at his funeral.
  • In 1890, black Union veteran Joseph T. Wilson wrote in his book, The Black Phalanx: A History of the Negro Soldiers of the United States, that New Orleans was home to two Native Guard regiments, which comprised 3,000 “colored men.” Referring to these regiments in an 1898 book, Union Captain Dan Matson said: “Here is a strange fact. We find that the Confederates themselves first armed and mustered the Negro as a solider in the late war.”
  • A book from 1866 contains the recollection of a Union man whose compatriot killed a black Confederate sniper “who, through his skill as a marksman, had done more injury to our men that any dozen of his white compeers…”
  • Union documents show Henry Marshall, a black soldier with the 14th Kentucky Cavalry, being held in Northern prisoner of war camps. A pension document from South Carolina reveals that “a free Negro who volunteered” for the army served from August 1861 to the end of the war — over three and a half years.
  • An obituary for George Mathewson says that the former slave received “a Cross of Honor for bravery in action,” based on his role as standard-bearer.
  • The New York Tribune noted “that the Rebels organized and employed ‘Negro troops’ a full year before our government could be persuaded to do any thing of the sort.” After the Battle of Gettys-burg, the New York Herald reported: “Among the rebel prisoners who were marched through Gettysburg there were observed seven negroes in uniform and fully accoutered as soldiers.”
  • An article from Smithsonian magazine relates: “A New York Times correspondent with Grant in 1863 wrote: ‘The guns of the rebel battery were manned almost wholly by Negroes, a single white man, or perhaps two, directing operations.'”
  • Amos Rucker, a former slave who fought for the South, was laid to rest after his death in 1905. Rucker’s tombstone , in the South View Cemetery on Jonesboro Road, has Rucker’s name printed on it along with the words “Confederate Soldier” and a Confederate flag. According to Curtis Harris of the Herndo Heritage Museum in Florida, Rucker served in the 33rd Georgia infantry. He served as a combat soldier until severe wounds to his leg left him permanently crippled, Harris said.
  • Federal Official Records, Series I, Vol XVI Part I, pg. 805: “There were also quite a number of negroes attached to the Texas and Georgia troops, who were armed and equipped, and took part in the several engagements with my forces during the day.”
  • Federal Official Records Series 1, Volume 15, Part 1, Pages 137-138: “Pickets were thrown out that night, and Captain Hennessy, Company E, of the Ninth Connecticut, having been sent out with his company, captured a colored rebel scout, well mounted, who had been sent out to watch our movements.”
  • Federal Official Records, Series I, Vol. XLIX, Part II, pg. 253 – April 6, 1865: “The rebels [Forrest] are recruiting negro troops at Enterprise, Miss., and the negroes are all enrolled in the State.”
  • Federal Official Records, Series I, Vol. XIV, pg. 24, second paragraph – “It is also difficult to state the force of the enemy, but it could not have been less than from 600 to 800. There were six companies of mounted riflemen, besides infantry, among which were a considerable number of colored men.” – referring to Confederate forces opposing him at Pocotaligo, SC., Colonel B. C. Christ, 50th Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, official report of May 30, 1862
  • “Sargt said war is close to being over. saw several negros fighting for those rebels.” – From the diary of James Miles, 185th N.Y.V.I., entry dated January 8, 1865

There are many more such references, including from a letter of a Union soldier who cam under fire by black confederate sharpshooters, but I do not have all of the sources, nor the time to compile them in full.

From James G. Bates’ letter to his father reprinted in the 1 May 1863 “Winchester [Indiana] Journal” [the 13th IVI [“Hoosier Regiment”] was involved in operations around the Suffolk, Virginia area in April-May 1863 ] – “I can assure you [Father,] of a certainty, that the rebels have negro soldiers in their army. One of their best sharp shooters, and the boldest of them all here is a negro. He dug himself a rifle pit last night [16 April 1863] just across the river and has been annoying our pickets opposite him very much to-day. You can see him plain enough with the naked eye, occasionally, to make sure that he is a “wooly-head,” and with a spy-glass there is no mistaking him.”

In closing, I present Roland Young, African American and Civil War Historian who says he is not surprised that blacks fought. He explains that,  “…some, if not most, Black southerners would support their country” and that by doing so they were “demonstrating it’s possible to hate the system of slavery and love one’s country.” This is the very same reaction that most black Americans showed during the American Revolution, where they fought for the colonies, even though the British offered them freedom if they fought for them. It has been estimated that over 65,000 Southern blacks were in the Confederate ranks. Over 13,000 of these, meet the enemy in some sort of combat. These Black Confederates included both slave and free. Some try to discount their role as being only cooks and labors, yet their duties performed are similar to duties performed by today’s Army personnel and certainly no one questions the current day cook who wears the United States Army green as being a “real soldier.”

I must make clear, I am very interested in this subject. If you have information for or against the argument of blacks serving as soldiers of the Confederacy, please CONTACT ME with your source. I’ll gladly add it here for others to use in their own research.


Presented for Consideration

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NelsonWinbush2nelson1And last, but not least, we have the testimony of 85 year old Mr. Nelson Winbush, whose grandfather (African American and slave to James Oldham) rode with General Nathan Bedford Forrest.  Nelson knew his grandfather when he was a boy in the 1930’s (pictured to the left). Pvt. Louis Napoleon Nelson served in Co. M, 7th Tennessee Cavalry of the Confederate Army, first working as a cook. The company was led by General Nathan Bedford Forrest. In the late stages of the war, Nelson was allowed to serve as a rifleman, and later served as chaplain to both blacks and whites; he had already memorized the King James Bible by heart.Before his death in 1934 at age 88, Nelson attended 39 Confederate reunions.

Nelson might not have volunteered to go to war, but Winbush argues that his grandfather and other black soldiers fought for many of the same reasons white soldiers from families that did not own slaves went to war: loyalty and patriotism. Winbush adds others: revenge and retribution against the North, which had invaded their homeland. Those who have not studied all of the reasons for the war give the North too much credit as liberators and abolitionists, he says. Nelson and other black Confederates were motivated by Union soldiers’ mistreatment of Southern women, black and white, and burning and looting of plantations that left Southerners to starve. Nelson, the grandson said, “wore his uniform with as much pride as any general who won fame in fighting the Yankees.” As a descendant from Nelson, a recognized Confederate veteran, Winbush later qualified for membership in the Sons of Confederate Veterans. He notes that his grandfather DID receive a pension from Tennessee for Confederate veterans, beginning in 1920.

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Also see list of Tennessee Colored Pension Applications for CSA Service. Remember, this is only one state of the Confederacy…

Excerpted from site linked directly above, reproduced here only because of the present state of the site: The following notice appeared on the the “Colored Man’s Application for Pension”: – Note the high percentage listed as “ACCEPTED“.

“The Negros’ pension law passed by the Tennessee Legislature, provides that Negros Pensioned by this Act must have been bona fide residents of this State three years if they served with a Tennessee Command, and ten years if they served with a command from any other State. They must have remained with the army until the close of the war, unless legally relieved from service. They must be indigent. Unless you come clearly under the law, it is useless to file an application.The board meets the second Tuesdays in January, April, July and October.”

Following are the names of the applicants available to this researcher at this time:

  • Abernathy, Ruff – b. in Giles County, TN in 1845; claimed service with the 3rd Tenn. Inf.; application accepted.
  • Akins, John – b. in Bedford County, TN in 1852; claimed service in the 9th Tenn. Cav.; application accepted.
  • Allison, Sam – b. in Haywood Co, TN in June 1840; claimed service in the 7th Tenn. Cav.; application rejected.
  • Amy, Pete – b. in Hawkins County, TN in August 1844; claimed service with the Supply Train Hoke’s Div.; application accepted.
  • Anderson, George – b. in Hickman County, TN on July 23, 1842; claimed service with the 9th Tenn. Cav. Co. C; application accepted.
  • Anderson, Ike – b. in Stewart County, TN on November 25, 1834; claimed service with the 1st Ky. Cav. Co. A; appliation rejected.
  • Arnold, Polk – b. in Bedford County, TN in 1844; claimed service with the Forrest Escort; application accepted.
  • Avant, Alfred Scott – b. in Rutherford County, TN in 1852; applicatiion rejected.
  • Averitt, Albert – b. in Rutherford County, TN in 1843; claimed service with the 18th Tenn. Inf. Co. C; application accepted.
  • Baker, Jim – b. in Russell County, AL in 1847; application rejected.
  • Banks, Peter (Porter) – b. in Kentucky in 1824: claimed service with the 2nd Tenn. Inf.; application accepted.
  • Barksdale, Henderson – b. in Virginia; claimed service with the 12th Tenn. Inf.; application rejected.
  • Bates, Henry – b. in Bradley County, TN; application rejected.
  • Beaumont, Ben – b. Montgomery County, TN in 1848; claimed service with the 10th Tenn. Cav.; application rejected.
  • Bell, Charles aka Harris – b. in Dickson County, TN in 1843; claimed service with the 11th Tenn. Inf. Co. K; application accepted.
  • Bell, William C. – b. in Robertson County, TN on January 22, 1840; claimed service with 30th Tenn. Inf.; disposition of application unknown.
  • Bibb, William – b. in Lownes County, MS in 1840; claimed service with the 12th Alabama Inf. Co. G; application accepted.
  • Biles, Jerry
  • Biles, William Houston – b. in Water Valley, MS in 1854; organization and disposition of application unknown.
  • Blackwell, Abe – b. in Shelby County, TN in 1846; application accepted.
  • Bledsoe, William Anthony – b. in Marion County, TN on January 29, 1846; application accepted.
  • Bobbit, Carter – b. in Madison County, TN; claimed service with the 14th Tenn. Cav.; application accepted.
  • Boyd, George Washington – b. in Christian County, KY; claimed service with the 2nd Ky. Cav.; application disposition unknown.
  • Bradley, R. H. – b. in Desoto County, MS in 1849; claimed service with the 29th Miss. Inf. Co. I; application disposition unknown.
  • Briggs, John – claimed service with the 4th Tenn. Cav. application disposition unknown.
  • Brown, Alfred – b. in Anderson, SC in 1844; organization and application disposition unknown.
  • Brown, Anderson – b. in Tuscaloosa, AL in 1939; application rejected.
  • Brown, John L. – b. in Davidson County, TN on October 25, 1839; claimed service with the 20th Tenn. Inf. Co. C; application accepted.
  • Bryant, Henry – b. in Virginia; claimed service with the Recruting Office; application accepted.
  • Buchanan, Henry – b. in Franklin County, TN in March 1845; claimed service with the 12th Tenn. Inf.; allpication disposition unknown.
  • Buckner, Wash
  • Buford, William – b. in Williamson County, TN in 1845; claimed service with the 9th Tenn. Inf.; applcation accepted.
  • Caldwell, John – b. in Charlotte, Dickson Co., TN; claimed service with the 1st Tenn. Cav.; application rejected.
  • Cannon, Charles – b. in Williamson County about 1841; claimed service with the 154th Tenn. Inf.; application accepted.
  • Cansler, Hugh Lawson – b. Marion County, TN in 1835; claimed service with the 43rd Tenn. Inf.; application rejected.
  • Carter, Bob – b. Prince Edward County, VA; claimed service in Breastworks; application accepted.
  • Caruthers, John – b. in Lebanon, Wilson Co., TN about 1835; claimed service with the 48th Tenn. Inf.; disposition of application unknown.
  • Cason, Frazier – b. in Henry County, TN in 1837; disposition of application unknown.
  • Catlett, Tom – b. in Sevier County, TN; organization and application unknown.
  • Chapman, Toney – b. in Marshall County, TN on June 18, 1849; claimed service with the 4th Tenn. Cav. Co. A; application accepted.
  • Church, Henry – b. in Maury County, TN on June 1, 1845; claimed service with the 48th Tenn. Inf.; application accepted.
  • Churchill, John – b. in Louisville, KY on September 15, 1844; claimed serviced with General Thomas Churchill’s Hq.; application disposition unknown.
  • Clayton, Sam – b. in Rutherford County, TN about 1848; claimed service with the 23rd Tenn. Inf.; application disposition unknown.
  • Cleveland, Maurice A. – claimed service with General John Adams’ staff; application disposition unknown.
  • Clickley, Tom
  • Cole, Nat – b. in Madison County, TN in 1838; organization unknown; application accepted.
  • Coleman, David B. – b. in Bolivar County, MS in August 1839; claimed service with the 6th Alabama Inf. Co. I; application disposition unknown.
  • Coleman, Jacob – b. in Courtland, Lawrence Co., AL in 1839; claimed service with the 11th Alabama Cal. Co. A; application accepted.
  • Coleman, Nelse
  • Collier, Sam -b. in Madison County, TN in 1839; claimed service with the 51st Tenn. Inf. Co. F; application accepted.
  • Conn, George Adams – b. in Williamson County, TN on February 10, 1845; claimed service with the Q. M. Hawes Brigade; application disposition unknown.
  • Cotton, Alonzo – b. in Davidson County, TN in 1846; organization unknown; application rejected.
  • Crudup, Handy Davis – b. in Wilson County, TN in 1846; claimed service with the 7th Tenn. Inf.; application accepted.
  • Crutcher, Jack – b. in Williamson, County, TN in 1835; claimed service with the 20th Tenn. Inf. Co. D; application accepted.
  • Cullom, Sam – b. in Maryland; claimed service with the 8th Tenn. Inf. Co. F; application accepted.
  • Cunnigham, Osborn – b. in Williamson County, TN; claimed service with the 1st Tenn. Inf. Co. D; application accepted.
  • Dabney, Mack – b. in Giles County on Decmber 15, 1845; claimed service with the 3rd tenn. Inf.; application accepted.
  • Dance, George – b. in Alabama near Tuscumbia; service with the 8th Tenn. Inf.; application accepted.
  • Davis, Ben – b. in Fayette County, TN on March 4, 1836; claimed service with Forrest’s Headquarters; application accepted.
  • DeGraffenfried, Nathan – b. in Fayette, County, TN; claimed service with the 154th Tenn. Sr. Inf. Co. B; application accepted.
  • Dillon, Jim – b. in Sumner County, TN in 1851; claimed service with the 4th Tenn. Inf.; application accepted.
  • Dismuke, Abram – b. in Noxubee County, MS; claimed servce as a shoemaker; disposition of application unknown.
  • Donnell, William M. – b. in Bedford County, TN in 1844; claimed service with the Commissary Dept.; application accepted.
  • Dortch, Charles -b. in Montgomery County, TN; claimed service with the 2nd Ky. Cav. Co. C; application rejected.
  • Douglas, Levi – b. in Maury County, TN on May 20, 1823; organization unknown; application rejected.
  • Drake, G. W. -b. in Van Buren County, TN; claimed service with the 16th Tenn. Inf.; application accepted.
  • Duke, Alfred – b. in Yalobusha County, MS in 1848; claimed service with Forrest’s Regt.; rejected.
  • Duncan, James – b. in Wayne County, TN in 1849; claimed service with the 1st Tenn. Cav.; application disposition unknown.
  • Dunn, James – b. in Smith County, TN in Deceember 1831; claimed service with the 7th Battl. Tenn. Cav.; application rejected.
  • Durley, Willis
  • Eames, Joe – claimed service with the 4th Tenn. Cav.; application disposition unknown.
  • Earle, Turner – b. near Grenada, MS on April 27, 1849; claimed service with the 3rd Tenn. Cav.; application disposition unknown.
  • Easley, Edom – b. – in Hickman County, TN on June 10, 1847; claimed service with the 10th Tenn. Ca. Co. I; application accepted.
  • Easley, W. M. – b.- in Hickman County, TN in 1848 or 1849; claimed service with the 24th Tenn. Inf. allpication accepted.
  • East, George Washington – b. in Davidson County, TN in 1848; claimed service with the Texas Cav. Co. H; application rejected.
  • Elder, Hal
  • Etherly, William – b. in Wilson County, TN; organization and application disposition unknown.
  • Farrington, Joe – b. in Chatham County, NC in March 1835; claimed service with the 5th N. C. Cav.; application accepted.
  • Fitzgerald, John Maston – b. in Maury County, TN in 1846; claimed service with the 48th Tenn. Inf. Co. A; application accepted.
  • Floyd, Wash
  • Forrest, Thornton – b. in Shelby County, Tenn about 1845.; claimed service with Forrest’s Hdq.; application accepted.
  • Foster, Joe – b. in Hickman County, TN on November 4, 1850; claimed service with the 9th Tenn. Inf.; application accepted.
  • Fountain, Willis – b. in Georgia on December 18, 1836; claimed service with the 6th Miss. Inf.; aplication accepted.
  • Francis, Edward – b. in Franklin County, TN in 1850; claimed Hospital service; application accepted.
  • Fuller, Lee -b. in Madison County, AL on May 22, 1847; claimed service with the 5th Alabama; application rejected.
  • Garner, George – b. Winchester, TN in 1847; claimed service with the 1st Tenn. Inf.; application accepted.
  • Garrett, George W. – b. in Baton Rouge, LA; claimed service with the 1st Colored Co. S.C.; application rejected.
  • Gatewood, Wesley – b. in Marshall County, MS in January 1838; claimed service with the 17th Miss. Inf. application accepted.
  • Gentry, James – b. in College Grove, Williamson Co., TN on August 12, 1846; claimed service with the 17th Tenn. Inf.; application accepted.
  • Gibson, Robert – b. in Hickman County, TN in 1846.
  • Gilliam, Robert – b. in Virginia in 1843 or 1844; application accepted.
  • Gober, Silas – b. in Fayette County, TN on July 19, 1842. claimed service with the 3rd Tenn. Cav.; application accepted.
  • Gooch, James – b. in Davidson County, TN on June 12, 1847; claimed service with the 4th Tenn. Cav.; application accepted.
  • Gooch, James – b. in Davisdon County, TN on June 12, 1847; claimed service with the Starnes Cav.; application accepted.
  • Gordon, Nathan – b. in Giles County, TN in 1844; claimes service with the 11th Tenn, Cav.; application accepted.
  • Gore, Henry – b. in Jackson County, TN; claimed service with the 8th Cav., application accepted.
  • Gray, Albert – b. in Hickman County, TN on June 6, 1846; claimed service with the 24th Tenn, Inf. Co. H; application accepted.
  • Gray, Dock – b. in Hickman County, TN on May 31, 1841; claimed service as a Scout; application accepted.
  • Green, John – in Stokes County, NC about 1850; claimed service with the North Carolina Unit; application rejected.
  • Greer, Jones – b. in Lincoln County, TN in 1844 or 1845; claimes service with the Forrest Escort; application accepted.
  • Gregory, Ned – b. in Lincoln County, TN in 1843;claimed service with the 1st Tenn. Inf. Co. C; application accepted.
  • Grisby, Thomas A. – b. in Linestone County, AL in 1850: claimed service with the 15th Tenn. Vac.; application rejected.
  • Grimes, Dan W. – b. in Dickson County, TN on February 2, 1845; claimed service with the 11th Tenn. Inf. Co. C: application accepted.
  • Guffin, Butler -claimed service with the 26th Georgia Inf.; application accepted.
  • Hailey, Albert – b. in Bedford County, TN in 1844 or 1845; calimed service with the 41st Tenn. Inf. Co. F; application rejected.
  • Hairston, John – b. in Virginia; orgainzation unknown; application rejected.
  • Hale, Reuben Grissim – b. in Smith County, TN in 1846 or 1847; claimed service with the 4th Tenn. Co. C; application accepted.
  • Hannah, George – b. Cheatham County, TN on September 10, 1847; claimed service with Forrest’s Cav.; application accepted.
  • Hannah, Jerry (Perry) – in Biggbyville, Maury Co., TN on December 12, 1840; claimed service with the 18th Inf./9th Battl. Cav.; application accepted.
  • Harding, James – in Davidson County, TN in 1849; claimed service with the 9th Tenn. Cav.; application rejected.
  • Harris, Charley
  • Harris, Wash – b. in LaGrange, TX in 1836; claimed service with Cheatham’s Div.; application rejected.
  • Hastings, Alex – in Bedford County, TN; claimed service with the 7th Tenn. Inf. Co A; application accepted.
  • Hawthorne, E. D. – b. in Haywood County, TN in 1849. claimed service with the 7th Tenn. Cav. Co. L; application accepted.
  • Hayes, Ceasar – b. i Shelby County, TN in 1843; claimed service with the 154th Tenn Inf.; application accepted.
  • Haynes, Washington D. – b. in Henry County, TN in 1834; claimed service with the 5th Tenn. Inf.; application disposition unknown.
  • Hays, Luke – b. in Williamson County, TN in 1852; organization unknown; application rejected.
  • Henderson, Henry C. – b. in Davidson County, NC in 1849; organization unknown; application accepted.
  • Henry, West – b. in Sumner County, TN.; claimed service with the 2nd and 21st Tenn. Cav. application accepted.
  • Hickerson, Clay – b. in Coffee County, TN on December 25, 1844; claimed service with the 24th Tenn.nf.Co. k; application disposition unknown.
  • Hord, Fred R. (Hoard) – Hawkins County, TN in 1844; claimed service with the 2nd Tenn. Cal. Co E; application disposition unknown.
  • Hornbeak, Rash – b. in Hickman County, TN on January 1846; claimed service with the 9th Cav. Bn.; application accepted.
  • House, Charles – claimed service with the 4th Tenn. Cav.; disposition of applivation unknown.
  • Howard, Roach – claimed service with the 3rd Tenn. Cav. ?; application disposition unknown.
  • Hunter, Booker – b. in Williamson County, TN in 1846; claimed service with Gen. Preston Smith’s Staff; application disposition unknown.
  • Hyde, Henry
  • Ivie, Wiley Sutton – b. in Bedford County, TN on August 15, 1842; claimed service with Q. M. Dept.; application disposition unknown.
  • Jackson, Henry – b. in Madison County, TN Ffebruary 1847; claimed service with Forrest’s Cav.; application accepted.
  • Jarnigan, David – b. in McMinn County, TN about 1841; claimed service with the 16th Tenn. Cav.; application accepted.
  • Jennings, Joseph – b. in Grainger County, TN in 1843; claimed service with the 12 th Tenn. Cav; application accepted.
  • Johnson, George Floyd – b. in Pulaski County, VA in 1843; claimed service with Wilcox Brigade; application accepted.
  • Johnson, Peter – b. in Lawrence County, TN on May 10, 1849; organization unknown; application accepted.
  • Johnson, Richard – b. in Virginia; claimed service with the 14th Miss. Inf. Co. I; application accepted.
  • Johnson, Tom – b. in Robertson County, TN about 1839; claimed service with the 50th Tenn. Inf.; application rejected.
  • Johnson, William – b. near Nolensville, TN about 1845; claimed service with White’s Battery; application accepted.
  • Jones, Bemjamin J. – b. near Vicksburg, MS in 1849; claimed service with the 3rd Tenn. Inf.; application accepted.
  • Jones, Jack – b. in Hickman County, TN on October 24, 1847; claimed service with the 24th Tenn Inf.; application accepted.
  • Jones, Leroy – b. in Shelby County, TN on March 9, 1838; claimed service with the 4th Tenn. Inf. Co. I; application accepted.
  • Jones, Monroe – b. in Warren County, MS in 1847; claimed service with the 1st Miss. Light Arty. Co. A; application accepted.
  • Jones, Willie – b. in North Carolina in 1841; claimed service with a North Carolina Unit; application rejected.
  • Kennedy, Manuel – b. in Winston County, MS on April 25, 1837; claimed service with the 15th Miss. Inf.; application rejected.
  • Kennedy (Kindley), James – b. in Henry County, TN on July 4, 1845; claimed service with the 46th Inf. Co. C; application rejected.
  • Kinnard, Taylor – b. in Williamson County, TN in 1843; claimed service with the 54th Tenn. Inf. Co. K; 1st application rejected; 2nd application accepted.
  • Kinnon, Taylor – B. in Williamson County, TN in 1844; claimed service with the 54th Tenn. Inf.; application rejected.
  • Kirk, Sam – b. in Rutherford County, TN; claimed Hospital service; application accepted.
  • Kittrell, Joe
  • Knight, Louis – b. in Franklin County, TN in 1848; claimed service with the 17th Tenn. Inf.; application accepted.
  • Lankford, Archie Davis – b. claimed service with the 2nd Tenn. Inf.; application disposition unknown.
  • Lawrence, Drucy – application disposition unknown.
  • Ledbetter, Ralph – b. in Rutherford County, TN; application disposition unknown.
  • Lee, Clark – claimed service with the 1st Ga. Regt. application accepted.
  • Lester, Richard – b. in Giles County, TN in 1843; claimed service with the 3rd Tenn. Inf. Co. G; application accepted.
  • Lester, Robert – b. in Giles County, TN in 1845; claimed service with the 18th Tenn. Inf. Co. K; application accepted.
  • Liggett, R. M. – b. in Roane County, TN on September 25, 1842; claimed service with the 2nd Tenn, Cav. Co. E; application disposition unknown.
  • Ligon, Henry – claimed service with the 14th Tenn. Inf. Co. H; application accepted.
  • Lipscomb, Thomas – b. in obion County, TN in 1844; claimed service with hte 9th Battalion Tenn. Cav.; application disposition unknown.
  • Locke, Alfred – b. in Rhea County, TN on May 24, 1846; claimed service with the 1st Tenn. Cav. Co. D; application is believed to have been accepted.
  • Luttrell (Littrell), Charles – b. in Hardeman County, TN about 1848; claimed service with the 14th Tenn Cav. Co A; application accepted.
  • Maclin, James – b. in Tipton County, TN in 1840; claimed service with the 7th Tenn. Cav. Co B; application accepted.
  • Maney, James – b. Murfreesboro, TN in 1843; claimed service with Gen. Maney’s Hq.; application accepted.
  • Mason, Plunk – b. b. in Franklin County, TN in 1833; claimed service with a Wagon Train; application accepted.
  • Mathes (McFarland), Dall – b. in Haywood County, TN in 1844; claimed service with Gen. Cheatham’s Hq.; application accepted.
  • Matthewson (Mathison), George – b. in Ballard County, KY abouy 1850; claimed service with Col. Davis’ Georgia Troops; application disposition unknown.
  • Mayberry, Jim – claimed service with the 24th Tenn. Inf.; application disposition unknown.
  • Mayes, Harrison – b. in Maury County, TN in 1842; claimed service with the 1st Tenn. Cav.; application disposition unknown.
  • McCarter, William (William C. Carter) – b. in Monroe County, TN in 1844; claimed service with the 62nd Tenn Inf.; application accepted.
  • McClaren, Bob – b. in Fayette County, TN on December 25, 1849; claimed service with the 14th Tenn. Cav.; application accepted.
  • McCulloch, Ned – b. in Rutherford County, TN; claimed service with the 17th Tenn. Inf.; application accepted.
  • McEwen, George W. – b. in Maury County, TN on August 4, 1847; claimed service with the 1st Tenn. Inf. Co. H; application accepted.
  • McFarland, Charles L. – b. in 1852.
  • McLemore, Daniel – claimed service with the 4th Tenn. Cav.; application disposition unknown.
  • McMillian, William – b. in Georgia; claimed service with the 37th Cav.; application rejected.
  • McNeel (McNeely), Sam – b. in Bolivar Hardeman County, TN on March 12, 1840; clained service with the 14th Tenn. Ca.; application rejected.
  • McNeely, Rush – b. in Henderson, Counrt, TN on August 11, 1824; claimed service with the 27th Tenn. Inf. Co A; application disposition unknown.
  • McNeil, Ausburn – b. in Alabama in 1847; claimed service with teamster; application disposition unknown.
  • McNeil, Sam (Simpson – b. in Hardeman County, TN in 1840; claimed service with the 7th Tenn. Cav. Co E; application accepted.
  • Mickles, Stepney – b. in North Carolina in 1845; claimed service with the 9th Miss. Inf.; application accepted.
  • Miller, William – b. in Rutherford County,TN in 1847; claimed service with the 11th Tenn. Cav.; application rejected.
  • Minor, Ned – b. in Montgomery County, TN in 1848; claimed service with the 10th Tenn. Inf.; application accepted.
  • Moore, Bemjamin – b. in Huntsville, AL in 1833; claimed service with the Alabama Unit; application accepted.
  • Moore, Giles – b. in Giles County, TN; claimed service with the 9th Ala. Cav.; application accepted.
  • Moore, John – b. in Hickman County, TN in Hickman County, TN on April;
  • Morris, Paden – b. in Virginia about 1846; claimed service with th Virginia Unit; application accepted.
  • Moses, John – b. in Madison County, TN; claimed service with the 7th Tenn. Cav.; application accepted.
  • Murray, Charles – b. in Upson, GA on April 12, 1843; claimed service with Murray’s Regt.; application rejected.
  • Murray, Branch – b. in Petersburg, VA; claimed service with the 17th Texas Inf. Co. K; application rejected.
  • Musgraves, Billie Webster – b. in Marshall County, MS claimed service with the 8th Miss. Cav.; application rejected.
  • Muzzall, Lewis – b. in Henry County; claimed service with the 20th Tenn. Cav.; application accepted.
  • Neal, Henry – application accepted.
  • Nelson, Henry – b. in Rutherford County, TN in 1842; claimed service with the 19th & 20th Tenn. Cav.; application disposition unknown.
  • Nelson, Louis Napoleon – b. in Lauderdale County, TN; claimed service with the 7th Tenn. Cav. Co M; application accepted.
  • Newsom, Sam – b. in Hickman County, TN on December 19, 1838; organization unknown; application accepted.
  • Newsom, Silas – b. in March 1843; claimed service with the 20th Tenn Inf.; application accepted.
  • Nicholoson, Isaac A. – b. in Davidson County, TN in 1844; claimed service with the Comm. Dept. Polk’s Corps; application accepted.
  • Nim, Wilkes – claimed service with Forrest’s Hdq; application accepted.
  • Nolen,Alex (Alack) – b. in Montgomery County, TN in 1846; claimed service with the 14th Tenn. Inf. Co B; application accepted.
  • Norris, Bill – b. in Talapoosa County, AL on June 22, 1843; claimed service with the Alabama Inf. Unit; application rejected.
  • Nowell, Smith – b. in Louisiana about 1847; claimed service with the 7th Tenn. Cav. Co. L; application accepted.
  • O’Neal, William – b. in Bickins County, AL in 1846; claimed service 12th Miss. Cav. application accepted.
  • Officer, Abe
  • Otey, Ephriam – b. in Virginia February 1845; claimed service with the Q. M. Dept.; application accepted.
  • Parrish, John – b. in Williamson County, TN; claimed service with the 2nd Tenn, Cav.; application accepted.Cav. Co. F; application rejected.
  • Patton, Robert B. – claimed service with the 4th Tenn. Cav. Co F; application rejected.
  • Payne, Tillman Price – b. in Smith County, TN in 1847; claimed service with
  • Payne, Tink – b. in Franklin County, TN on January 15, 1860; organization unknown; application rejected.
  • Pearce, George – claimed service with the 8th Confed. Cav.; application disposition unknown.
  • Pearce, Green – claimed service as a Laborer; application disposition unknown.
  • Perkins, Chanie
  • Perry, Manson – claimed service with a Virginia Unit; application disposition unknown.
  • Phillips, Asa – b. in Franklin County, TN; claimed service with the 1st Tenn. Inf.; application rejected.
  • Porter, Alex – b. in Henry County, TN on April 2, 1845; claimed service with the 29th Tenn. Cav.; application accepted.
  • Pugh, Dawson – b. in North Carolina in March 1832; claimed service with the 7th Tenn Cav.; application accepted.
  • Quarles, Henry (Harvey) – b. in Jackson County, TN on August 1, 1845; claimed service with the 28th Tenn. Inf.; application accepted.
  • Ranson, Alexander – b. in Rutherford County, TN in 1840; claimed service with the 24th Tenn. Inf. Co. A; application accepted.
  • Read, Henry – b. in Haywood County, TN in 1847; claimed service with the 7th Tenn. Cav. Co. M; application accepted.
  • Ready, Albert – b. in Rutherford County, TN in 1848; claimed service with the 23rd Tenn. Inf. application accepted.
  • Reeves, James – b. in Wilson County, TN in 1833; claimed service with the 7th Tenn. Inf. Co. F; application rejected.
  • Reid, Nathan – b. in Madison County, TN in 1847; claimed service with the 6th Tenn Inf. Co. K; application accepted.
  • Rice, Richard – b. in Hawkins County, TN in 1831; claimed service with the 29th Tenn. Inf. Co. F; application rejected.
  • Rivers, Matt – b. in Kato Parish, LA on May 16, 1837; claimed service with the 11th Tenn. Cav.; application rejected.
  • Robertson, James – organization and application disposition unknown.
  • Robertson, William – b. in Maury County, TN in 1847; claimed service with Dunk Cooper’s Co.; application rejected.
  • Robinson, James – b. in Lincoln County, TN about 1840; claimed service with the Manley’s Battery; application accepted.
  • Robison, John Oscar – b. in Hardeman County, TN on May 4, 1845; claimed service with Duncan’s Cav.; application accepted.
  • Rodgers, William – b. in Weakly County, TN in 1847; claimed service with the 31st Tenn. Inf.; application accepted.
  • Rowe, Will – b. in Henry County, TN on March 20, 1845; application disposition unknown.
  • Rucker, William – b. in Rutherford County, TN in 1842; claimed service with the 2nd Tenn.Inf.; application accepted.
  • Russell, Frank – b. in Bedford County, TN; claimed service with Forrest’s Escot; application accepted.
  • Russell, Peter – b. in Lewis County, TN on October 10, 1845; claimed service with Napier’s Regt.; application accepted.
  • Sanford, Pete – b. in Tipton County, TN in 1842; claimed service with Looney’s Regt.; application accepted.
  • Schoolfield, Henry Mathis – b. in Virginia in 1842; claimed service with the 24th Tenn. Cav.; Co. F; application disposition unknown.
  • Searcy, Shadrick – claimed service with the the 46th Georgia Inf.; application accepted.
  • Seay, Frank M. b. in Rutherford County, TN on January 25, 1843; claimed service with the 24th Tenn. Inf. Co. C; application accepted.
  • Seward, Tode – claimed service with the 28th Tenn. Inf.; application disposition unknown.
  • Shad, Steven – b. in Carroll County, TN on January 5, 1845; claimed service with the 10th Tenn. Cav.; application accepted.
  • Sharpe, Cal – b. in Lewis County, TN on September 12, 1841; claimed service with Forrest’s Regt.; application accepted.
  • Shelby, Wallace – b. in Davidson County, TN about 1840; claimed service Hospital Service; application rejected.
  • Shelton, Charlie – claimed service with the 6th Miss. Inf.; application unknown.
  • Smith, J. Wess – b. in Lincoln County, TN on may 2, 1848; claimed service with the 17th Tenn. Inf.; application accepted.
  • Smith, Lewis – b. in Tipper County, NC; claimed service with the 16th Tenn. Cav.; application accepted.
  • Smith, Presley – b. in Davidson County, TN; claimed service with the 6th Tenn.Inf.; application disposition unknown.
  • Starnes, Hardin – b. in Williamson County, TN; claimed service with the 4th Tenn. Cav.; application accepted.
  • Stegall, Robert – b. in Bedford County, TN on December 26, 1843; claimed service with Q. M. Dept.; application disposition unknown.
  • Stephenson, Monroe – in Maury County, TN; claimed service with the 9th Bttn.; application accepted.
  • Stone, Fee – b. in Richmond County, VA on September 17, 1843; claimed Island #10 service; application rejected.
  • Stover, Robert – b. in Carter County, TN in 1847; organization unknown; application accepted.
  • Swell, George – b. in Fayette County, TN in 1841; claimed service with the 14th Miss. Inf.; application rejected.
  • Swift, Aaron – b. in Dyer County, TN in 1843; claimed service with the 12th Tenn. Inf. Co. A; application rejected.
  • Tansil, Ed – b. in Weakley County, TN in 1844; claimed service with the 31st Tenn. Inf.; application accepted.
  • Terry, John – b. in Bledsoe County, TN in 1826; claimed service with the 2nd Tenn. Cav. Co. F; application accepted.
  • Thomas, Add – b. in Lewis County, TN on September 6, 1848; claimed service with Col. W. B. Bates; application accepted.
  • Thomas, Ben – b. in Caroline County, VA in 1847; claimed service with the 31st Ala. Inf. Co. A; application rejected.
  • Thompson, Marshall – b. in Maury County, TN on April 10, 1852; application accepted.
  • Thornton, Edward – b. in Tallahatchie County, MS in 1844; claimed service as teamster; application rejected.
  • Tidwell, Marshall – in Hickman County, TN on April 13, 1846; claimed service with the 24th Tenn. Inf.; application accepted.
  • Travis, Jack – b. in Christian Co. KY about 1836; claimed service with Co. I, 27th Reg.; application rejected.
  • Tuggle, Richard – b. in Haywood County, TN; claimed service with the 13th Tenn. Inf.; application accepted.
  • Tullus, Blunt – b. claimed service with the 4th Tenn. Cav; application disposition unknown.
  • Turner, Peter – b. in Sumner County in 1840; claimed service with the 30th Tenn. Inf.; application accepted.
  • Tyson, Alfred – b. in Haywood County, TN in 1845; claimed service with the 12th Ky. Cav. Co. B; application disposition unknown.
  • Ventrees, Peter – b. in Edmondson County, KY in 1846 (or 1840); claimed service with the 6th Ky. Inf. or Cav.; application accepted.
  • Walker, Bailey – b. in Dyer County, TN; claimed service with the 13th Tenn. Inf.; application accepted,
  • Walker, Isaac L. – b. in Hickman County, TN; organization unknown; application accepted.
  • Ward, Mose – b. in Hickman County, TN on November 10, 1934; claimed service with the 24th Tenn. Inf. Co. C; application accepted.
  • Ware, Charles – b. in Warren county, TN on March 3, 1846; claimed service with the 16th Tenn. Inf.; application accepted.
  • Watkins, Wade – b. in Haywood County, TN; claimed service with the 48th Tenn. Cav.?; application accepted.
  • Webb, Charlie – b. in Charleston, SC about 1840; claimed service with the 13th Tenn. Inf.; application accepted.
  • Webber, Lee – b. in Shelby County in 1846; claimed service with the 2nd Ky. Cav. Co. F; application accepted.
  • Wharton, Frank – b. in Madison County, TN; claimed service with the 14th Tenn. Cav.; application accepted.
  • White, Dick – b. in Haywood County, TN about 1841; claimed service with the 6th Tenn. Inf.; application accepted.
  • Whitelaw, Wright – b. in Kentucky on December 25, 1836; claimed service with the 16th Tenn Cav.; application rejected.
  • Whitelow, Wright – b. in Kentucky in 1835; claimed service with the 7th Tenn. Cav.; application rejected.
  • Whiteside, Charley – b. in Williamson County, TN on March 15, 1838; claimed service with the 48th Tenn. Inf; application accepted.
  • Whitesides, Charles – organization and application disposition unknown.
  • Whorton, Alex (Big Alex) – b. in McNairy County, TN in 1851; claimed service with the 154th Tenn. Inf.; application accepted.
  • Whorton, Alex (Little Alex) b. in McNairy County, TN in 1850; claimed service with the 21st Tenn. Cav.; application accepted.
  • Wilkerson, Charles – b. in Fayette County, TN on November 18, 1843; claimed service with the 1st Confederate Cav. Co. I; application accepted.
  • Williams, George Henry – b. in Wilson County, TN in 1838; claimed service with the 18th Tenn. Inf. Co. I; application accepted.
  • Windrow, Wyatt – organization and application disposition unknown.
  • Windrow, Wyatt – b. in Rutherford County, TN; organization unknown; application accepted.
  • Winfield, Henry – b. in Lynchburg, VA on January 9, 1827; claimed service as Jeff Davis Bodyguard; application accepted.
  • Winston, Manuel – b. in Tipton County, TN about 1845; claimed service with the 9th Tenn. Inf. Co. E; application accepted.
  • Withers, James W. – b. in Shelby County, TN in 1847; claimed service with the 3rd Miss. Cav. Co. F; application accepted.
  • Wood, M. E. – b. in Hamilton County, TN on July 1, 1848; claimed service with Morgan’s Cav.; application rejected.
  • Woods, John – b. in Lewis County, TN on June 10, 1847; claimed service with Col. Napier’s Regt.; application accepted.
  • Woods, Smith – b. in Dyer County, TN in 1846; claimed service with the 20th Tenn. Cav. Co. G; application disposition unknown.
  • Word, George – b. in Wilson County, TN 1848; claimed service with the 20th Tenn. Cav.; application accepted.
  • Wright, Austin – b. in Tipton County, TN on July 9, 1850; claimed service with the 7th Tenn. Cav.; Co. B; application rejected.
  • Wyatt, William – b. in Gibson County, TN; claimed service with the 3rd Mo. Cav. application rejected.
  • Yancy, George Washington – b. in Houston County, GA on January 1, 1844; claimed service with the 4th Ga. Inf. Co. E; application accepted.
  • Youree, Henry – b. in Sumner County, TN on March 18, 1843; claimed service with the 2nd Tenn. Inf.; application accepted.

Did you see the name of an ancestor or other family member? Would you like to have more information about a name that is familiar to you? In addition to the information already provided, other facts may include the master’s name, duties during the war, names of other family members and more.

SOURCES:

  • Index To Tennessee Confederate Pension Applications by Samuel Sistler (Nashville, TN, Sistler & Assoc., 1994)
  • Tennessee Confederate Pension Applications (TSL&A microfilm publication, 114 reels)

 

 

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